To find success in marketing, ask for directions

To be effective in marketing, you have to see things from the customer’s point of view.

You have to put your own thoughts, feelings and assumptions aside, and see things from the customer’s perspective. It starts by understanding who they really are, what they think of you, and what they want or need.

But the answers to these questions don’t come from within your four walls. They require us to step outside, talk to customers and prospects, and develop an accurate understanding of what is important to them—asking for directions, if you will. Continue reading

Are you saying the right things?

Speech bubble with ellipses

You have brand standards (don’t you?). You have a marketing plan (right?). You think you’re ready to take the world by storm. But there’s one piece missing:

a messaging platform.

The messaging platform doesn’t always get the love it deserves because it’s often tucked into a branding guide or a marketing plan, so most people don’t recognize it for what it is. More likely, however, it’s overlooked altogether. Continue reading

Extensible, relatable, shareable, demonstrable: Why the case study is a perfect marketing tool.

Several months ago, a client contacted me to write a long-form case study on a major project she’d just completed with great success. I hadn’t written too many case studies before—I’m guessing because it’s a labor-intensive marketing tool that takes a bit more effort than shorter pieces of content like e-mail campaigns, social media posts or website landing pages.

After completing Stephanie’s case study, however, I’m convinced case studies are something all of my clients should be doing.  Continue reading

How do you measure up?

we marketers are a critical bunch.

With our industry evolving at a breakneck pace, being a marketer is tougher than ever before. And we’re hard on ourselves about it.

A survey conducted by e-mail marketing company Emma asked marketing professionals how often they meet work expectations:

88 percent say they meet expectations “occasionally”, “rarely” or “never.”

Now, it’s unclear whether these expectations are set by the marketers themselves or they’re sent down from above—but from where I sit it doesn’t matter. Regardless of who holds the measuring stick, when you’re a “pleaser” like me, it’s a big morale buster to go home each night feeling like you’re falling shy of the mark. Continue reading