It’s time to take a stand

Like most of you, I subscribe to several industry newsletters. And like most of you, I don’t make time to read them. A select few, however, always get my attention—like this one from David C. Baker titled “Why No One Wants to Read Your Newsletters.”

One of David’s points hit me square in the face. Rather than generate “news” and “content” that people may not care about (or may ignore completely) provide insight that will cause them to reflect on your message, save it, or forward it.

Make people think. Take a stand. Articulate a viewpoint,” David says.

So here I go…about to take a stand. Articulate a viewpoint. Provide insight. Continue reading

To find success in marketing, ask for directions

To be effective in marketing, you have to see things from the customer’s point of view.

You have to put your own thoughts, feelings and assumptions aside, and see things from the customer’s perspective. It starts by understanding who they really are, what they think of you, and what they want or need.

But the answers to these questions don’t come from within your four walls. They require us to step outside, talk to customers and prospects, and develop an accurate understanding of what is important to them—asking for directions, if you will. Continue reading

Are you saying the right things?

Speech bubble with ellipses

You have brand standards (don’t you?). You have a marketing plan (right?). You think you’re ready to take the world by storm. But there’s one piece missing:

a messaging platform.

The messaging platform doesn’t always get the love it deserves because it’s often tucked into a branding guide or a marketing plan, so most people don’t recognize it for what it is. More likely, however, it’s overlooked altogether. Continue reading

You’re going to want to read this…

Woman reading

“no one reads anymore.”

While America’s shrinking attention span is well documented, the claim that “people don’t read anymore” is not.

According to the Pew Research Center:

  • the percentage of adults who have read a book in the last year is holding steady at over 70 percent; and,
  • the average number of books a person reads per year is 12 (and younger adults are actually reading more than older adults).

what does this have to do with marketing? more than you might think.

Continue reading